Coach and Facilitator

Developing our talents and skills to be the best we can be not only gives us a sense of wellbeing but is deeply satisfying when those talents are turned to achieving something which impacts positively on even one other person. Once an individual sees the value of doing the best they can as being in service to the greater whole, a bigger purpose than simply their own life satisfaction, then they find motivation and meaning in absolutely everything they do, however “menial” the world might find it.

To laugh often and love much;

To win the respect of intelligent persons and the affection of children;

To earn the approval of honest critics and endure the betrayal of false friends;

To appreciate beauty;

To find the best in others;

To give of one’s self without the slightest thought of return;

To have accomplished a task, whether by a healthy child, a rescued soul, a garden patch or a redeemed social condition;

To have played and laughed with enthusiasm and sung with exaltation;

To know that even one life has breathed easier because you have lived;

This is to have succeeded.”

Ralph Waldo Emerson

The Anahata principle

Releasing Creative Energy 
A paper by June Burrough (1991)

The Anahata Principle is based on the concept of Openness, Creativity and Courage in relationship.

  • Learn more about how I am and how others see me
  • Work with mutual respect and positive acknowledgement.
  • Take risks – Push limits – Perceived risks are often less risky in reality.
  • Learning can have painful stages – but great rewards!
  • Openness enables individuals and groups to progress through change.

Openness comes, in part, from developing an ability to take risks, allowing others to support and help us, and allowing ourselves to be able to receive acknowledgement and constructive criticism. Creativity is needed to challenge habits and bring about change, transition, development and progress. Courage is necessary in human relationships to break down well-structured social barriers, to break away from the limitations we place around ourselves, those we place around others and those we allow others to place around us.

It seems that individuals who explore themselves and their world better define who they are, what they have and how they relate to others. By being aware of this, they have an ability to decide how to use what they have to best effect, in all human relationships. The more individuals know and understand themselves, the better able they are to increase their effectiveness in all the spheres of life in which they operate. The more effective an individual becomes, the more ability they will have to achieve a life with fullness, meaning and depth. If individuals have trust in themselves they are more able to trust themselves with others.

It could be said that every experience in life has impact on all those people involved in that experience. If that impact is processed, learning will result from the experience, either in changed behaviour and thought patterns, or in affirmations for the individual about their rightness in behaviour and thought. By first defining the “gremlins” – fears, blocks, barriers and habits – which interfere with our behaviours and thoughts, we can then explore how to deal with these. We can work towards every experience having maximum possible positive impact on both ourselves and others. Through doing this it is possible to move from a position of fear to one of excitement, and nurture an atmosphere of trust.